Looking for a spiritual experience in silence and nature?

Get in touch with your soul through different itineraries among the most sacred places. Visit a mysterious hermitage in the heart of a natural landscape through St. Francis’ Way to La Verna; follow St. Vicinio trail on foot or by bike; try Via Romea Germanica or the path of Dante to find harmony with yourself and your spirit.

Discover all the PATHS...

Map key

in Romagna region

1 - Saint Francis' Way from Rimini to La Verna

Opened in 2013, St. Francis Way from Rimini to La Verna passes through some places visited by the saint in his journey to Valmarecchia in 1213, and winds along an itinerary lasting about five days walking from the Adriatic Sea over the Tuscan-Romagna Apennines along the charming Valley of the River Marecchia, still with its centuries –old woods, fortified towns, old parish churches and spectacular views.

The trail follows ancient road systems rejoining other trails of central Italy near La Verna and dedicated to the saint, creating a single national route that leads all the way to Rome.
The trail brings you to numerous convents, places of religious significance and peace. From the Convent of Minor Friars at Verucchio with the centuries-old cypress of St. Francis, to the monastery of St. Igne, built in 1244 in the wood at the foot of the cliff face of San Leo, to the convent of the Clarisse and Minor Friars at Sant’Agata Feltria. It passes through fortified towns steeped in history such as San Leo, the place where Count Orlando Catani gave Monte della Verna to Saint Francis.

Intersections
The route joins St. Vicinius’ Way and St. Anthony’s Way. St. Francis’ Way from Rimini to La Verna is listed in the Atlas of Paths of the Mibact. Also one of the itineraries promoted in TTT.

5 itineraries between nature and spirituality in Romagna. A journey on foot brings with it emotions that are difficult to describe, a treasure of sensations and perceptions that are difficult to comprehend from the sofa at home. The views and panoramas that open up to the cadenced rhythm of the steps, the furtive encounters with the inhabitants of the woods, the scents of the mountains, the encounter with a fellow human being, whether it is a local community or another solitary walker, are elements that are difficult to place outside the moment in which we feel them.

Romagna has always been a land of passage. Set horizontally with respect to the Italian boot, it has been an essential stop for wayfarers, goods and pilgrims. But it is also a land rich in ancient testimonies of faith enclosed in its culture, in the places of prayer and in the routes that once wound between abbeys and convents, between cathedrals and ancient places of worship. Today, these routes are the paths of a map leading to the slow soul of the territory.

2 - Way of San Vicinio ring route from Sarsina to Sarsina

St. Vicinius’ Way follows a circular route which extends for almost 350 kilometres between the provinces of Forli-Cesena, Arezzo and Rimini and which in many stretches is superimposed on the ancient Roman road system. Dedicated to St. Vicinius, the first bishop of Sarsina between the 4th and 5th centuries and a key person in the evangelisation process of the province of Ravenna, it winds through the places that typify the life of the saint, basically following the Savio Valley between Monte Fumaiolo and the Adriatic Sea.

Today the trail not only passes through important natural environments which are unique and picturesque with their flora and fauna, such as the Casentinesi Forests National Park Monte Falterona and Campigna, which has obtained recognition as Unesco Heritage, but also offers an experience of peace and meditation in some important places of Christian spirituality such as the Madonna del Monte at Cesena and the Basilica of St Vicinius in Sarsina where it is still possible to see the rite of the Saint’s Collar.

The ring route of the trail leads to the Sanctuary of La Verna, the “Holy Face” in Borgo San Sepolcro in Tuscany and the picturesque Hermitage of Camaldoli, a centre of meditation and spirituality.

Together with the more important places of worship, the trail brings you to small sanctuaries and country churches of even more remote origins which, being located in remote places, are still the object of local devotion and contribute to passing down that atmosphere of spirituality which is partly due to their particular natural location.

Intersections
The route joins the Romea Germanica Way and St. Francis Way. St. Vicinius’ Way is listed in the Atlas of Paths of the Mibact. This is one of the routes promoted in TTT.

5 itineraries between nature and spirituality in Romagna. A journey on foot brings with it emotions that are difficult to describe, a treasure of sensations and perceptions that are difficult to comprehend from the sofa at home. The views and panoramas that open up to the cadenced rhythm of the steps, the furtive encounters with the inhabitants of the woods, the scents of the mountains, the encounter with a fellow human being, whether it is a local community or another solitary walker, are elements that are difficult to place outside the moment in which we feel them.

Romagna has always been a land of passage. Set horizontally with respect to the Italian boot, it has been an essential stop for wayfarers, goods and pilgrims. But it is also a land rich in ancient testimonies of faith enclosed in its culture, in the places of prayer and in the routes that once wound between abbeys and convents, between cathedrals and ancient places of worship. Today, these routes are the paths of a map leading to the slow soul of the territory.

3 - Dante's Way ring route from Ravenna to Ravenna

395 km of which 194 in Emilia-Romagna region
Cammino di Dante (Dante's Way) is a ring-route between Romagna and Casentino area that retraces the ideal route that Dante Alighieri took at the beginning of the 12th century between the cities of Ravenna and Florence and whose route develops away from paved roads and along ancient "ridge" paths of Etruscan-Roman origin.

The Cammino has as its ends the Tomb of Dante in Ravenna, the starting point of the route, and Museo Casa di Dante in Florence. It largely crosses the places of Dante's exile together with the ones that the poet recounted in many of the passages of the Divine Comedy.

INTERSECTIONS Cammino di Dante joins Via Romea Germanica and Cammino di Assisi.
Cammino di Dante is included in Mibact's Atlas of Italian Routes..

5 itineraries between nature and spirituality in Romagna. A journey on foot brings with it emotions that are difficult to describe, a treasure of sensations and perceptions that are difficult to comprehend from the sofa at home. The views and panoramas that open up to the cadenced rhythm of the steps, the furtive encounters with the inhabitants of the woods, the scents of the mountains, the encounter with a fellow human being, whether it is a local community or another solitary walker, are elements that are difficult to place outside the moment in which we feel them.

Romagna has always been a land of passage. Set horizontally with respect to the Italian boot, it has been an essential stop for wayfarers, goods and pilgrims. But it is also a land rich in ancient testimonies of faith enclosed in its culture, in the places of prayer and in the routes that once wound between abbeys and convents, between cathedrals and ancient places of worship. Today, these routes are the paths of a map leading to the slow soul of the territory.

4 - Via Romea Germanica from Ravenna to Bagno di Romagna

The Romea Germanica Way retraces the journey undertaken by Friar Albert of Stade in 1236 to Rome and meticulously written up in his travel diary. It was one of the “Peregrinationes Maiores” (most important places of pilgrimage) for the pilgrims of the period and one of the routes preferred by kings, Saxon emperors and Swabian sovereigns to maintain their contact with the city of the popes.

Today this ancient route of about 1022 km is a great European route of culture and religious significance which passes through several countries and touches on some of the major Italian cities which today still have an important role in history.
The Romea Germanica Way starts from Augsburg, the city where the schism of 1517 was drawn up, and passes through Trento, the city of the Counter-Reformation, and Padua, home to the Basilica of St. Anthony. It enters Emilia Romagna by crossing the Po Valley Plain passing through Ferrara and from here, along several variants, it arrives at the Pomposa Abbey and Ravenna, the home of Byzantine religious locations and the magnificent Mausoleum of Theodoric. At the foot of the Apennine range the Romea Germanica Way climbs toward Bagno di Romagna and the Serra pass, crossing the Casentinesi Forests National Park from where it drops again toward Tuscany on the way to Rome.

Intersections The Romea Germanica Way joins St. Anthony’s Way, the Assisi Way and Dante’s Way.
The Romea Germanica Way is listed in the Atlas of Paths of the Mibact.

5 itineraries between nature and spirituality in Romagna. A journey on foot brings with it emotions that are difficult to describe, a treasure of sensations and perceptions that are difficult to comprehend from the sofa at home. The views and panoramas that open up to the cadenced rhythm of the steps, the furtive encounters with the inhabitants of the woods, the scents of the mountains, the encounter with a fellow human being, whether it is a local community or another solitary walker, are elements that are difficult to place outside the moment in which we feel them.

Romagna has always been a land of passage. Set horizontally with respect to the Italian boot, it has been an essential stop for wayfarers, goods and pilgrims. But it is also a land rich in ancient testimonies of faith enclosed in its culture, in the places of prayer and in the routes that once wound between abbeys and convents, between cathedrals and ancient places of worship. Today, these routes are the paths of a map leading to the slow soul of the territory.

5 - Viae Misericordiae ring route from Pomposa Abbey to the Hermitage of Gamogna

A total of 245 Km, of which 225 km in Emilia-Romagna.
This route was promoted by the Diocese of Faenza for the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy as an opportunity to discover a land of hard workers and, most of all, ancient faith.

From the Pomposa Abbey (Adriatic coast) to the Hermitage of Gamogna (Apennines of Tuscany-Romagna), this loop route passes through the art cities of Comacchio, Faenza and Bagnacavallo and travels across lands rich in faith, culture, art, natural and fluvial parks, as well as a welcoming community and food and wine specialties. This path can be walked with the “Credenziale del Pellegrino” (Pilgrim credentials) issued by the Diocese of Faenza. This is a route that you will never forget.

Junctions:
Romea Germanica Way, St. Anthony’s Way, Dante’s Way, Assisi Way. Nature trails: Alta Via trail of the Parks, Path of the Sacred Forests, Frassati trails.

5 itineraries between nature and spirituality in Romagna. A journey on foot brings with it emotions that are difficult to describe, a treasure of sensations and perceptions that are difficult to comprehend from the sofa at home. The views and panoramas that open up to the cadenced rhythm of the steps, the furtive encounters with the inhabitants of the woods, the scents of the mountains, the encounter with a fellow human being, whether it is a local community or another solitary walker, are elements that are difficult to place outside the moment in which we feel them.

Romagna has always been a land of passage. Set horizontally with respect to the Italian boot, it has been an essential stop for wayfarers, goods and pilgrims. But it is also a land rich in ancient testimonies of faith enclosed in its culture, in the places of prayer and in the routes that once wound between abbeys and convents, between cathedrals and ancient places of worship. Today, these routes are the paths of a map leading to the slow soul of the territory.
in Marche region

1 - Between Hermitages and Abbeys in the Province of Pesaro and Urbino

The itinerary winds through various municipalities in the province of Pesaro and Urbino where spirituality has developed in certain natural contexts. Marche Apennines have always been an ideal destination for hermit saints, who found refuge here in hermitages and rock caves. Monasticism spread in Marche region as early as the 7th and 8th centuries: monasteries, coenobia and abbeys became true bastions of faith and religiosity.

This itinerary highlights one of the primacies that Marche Region holds, that of being among the first geographical areas of the Italian peninsula to have welcomed the phenomenon of monasticism, which was to constitute one of the pillars in the formation process of western civilisation.

The aspiration to essentiality and spirituality represents a feature of the history of Marche people, whose values over the centuries were manifested in the simplicity of the Benedictine and then Franciscan messages.